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Kansas State University has not implemented a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, but that is likely only because Kansas legislative policy prevents the university from doing so. K-State president Richard Myers says if university administration could implement a vaccine mandate, it would. Despite the lack of COVID-19 vaccine requirements at K-State, Myers says over 80 percent of students have received at least one dose. The overall vaccination rate for the university, which includes faculty and staff in addition to students, is lower. As of Aug. 13, Lafene Health Center had distributed over 7,500 COVID-19 vaccinations. Myers says incentives for getting the vaccine…

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The Manhattan Area Chamber of Commerce is launching a website to promote the city to working professionals. Talent strategies coordinator Amber Wilhelm describes what the website, madeformanhattan.org, will feature: According to Manhattan Area Chamber of Commerce president and CEO Jason Smith, the website is meant to create an online resource where people who are looking at moving to Manhattan can see what the area has to offer. In addition to the website, Smith says the chamber has also put together boxes full of post cards featuring notes from area residents about experiences they have had in Manhattan. To learn more…

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Loss of food vendor The Manhattan-Ogden school district has lost its largest food vendor. That’s according to assistant superintendent Eric Reid, who told the school board Wednesday that the vendor informed the district just last week that it would be canceling its contract. The vendor, Sysco, which is a wholesale food distributor, supplied about 80 percent of the district’s food supplies. According to Reid, Sysco attributed the canceled contract to supply chain issues stemming from staffing shortages. Reid says child nutrition director Stephanie Smith has been working to find alternative solutions until other vendors can be found, however the district may…

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The Pottawatomie County Commission met with department heads Monday to discuss how to spend federal COVID-19 stimulus funds. Pott. County has so far received about $2.4 million, with another approximately $2.4 million set to arrive in the near future. Ideas ranged from Justice Center security upgrades and a storm-water detention pond to a drone program, which Sheriff Shane Jager says would be useful for his department and many others. Other ideas focused more on compensation for new and existing employees. EMS director Hal Bumgarner says funds could be used to recruit new talent. Multiple administrators also suggested extra compensation for…

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The U.S. Department of Energy has recognized the Manhattan Housing Authority (MHA) for its renovation of the Apartment Towers near 5th St. and Leavenworth St. Through the use of U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) funds, the Better Building Initiative and a loan obtained with assistance from the City of Manhattan, MHA was able to improve the energy efficiency of the public housing facility. While the recognition emphasizes the energy-efficiency aspect of the project, Manhattan city commissioner Linda Morse explains that there is more to it than that. According to Morse, the loan, which was worth nearly $1…

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Housing-study representation The Pottawatomie County Commission has requested representation on a Manhattan housing study steering committee. The discussion came up during Manhattan city manager Ron Fehr’s monthly update to the Pott County Commission. Fehr described during the discussion what exactly will be looked at during the study. The request for representation came after Commissioner Pat Weixelman commented about how Pott County has provided “medium-ranged houses” to local residents for a number of years, to which Fehr was in agreement. The Manhattan City Commission will further discuss the housing study at its next legislative session on August 17. Motor-grader fleet The Pottawatomie County…

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Hot and humid weather can spark disease outbreaks on ornamental and garden vegetable plants. Riley County Extension Horticulture Agent Gregg Eyestone says fungicide treatments can only do so much. Eyestone goes on to emphasize the importance of letting the plants dry out after a bout of moisture as a preventative measure against disease. Fungicides are used as a preventative measure not as a curative one, and Eyestone says other practices are necessary in order to keep your plants healthy. The rose and peonies flowers are some of the most affected plants during this time of the year, as well as…

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Dozens gathered Saturday to attend the open house of USD 383’s first new school building in 25 years – Oliver Brown Elementary. The event kicked off with speeches by a few local school leaders and Cheryl Brown Henderson, the daughter of the school’s namesake, who was part of the famed Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court case. While addressing the crowd, Brown spoke about her father’s legacy and beliefs. In her speech, Henderson also spoke about why Oliver Brown Elementary teachers will make the school a special place for students. Also speaking at the event was Oliver Brown Elementary…

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The Greater Manhattan Community Foundation is increasing efforts to raise the comfort level of those in the community hesitant to get the COVID-19 vaccine. President and CEO Vern Henricks listed a number of community-led efforts going on this week and over the next several days, including some incentives being offered by local businesses and organizations. The Juneteenth Committee will also work with youth aged 12 to 17 Saturday in a back to school vaccine effort, offering a shopping spree incentive to Manhattan Town Center. He also spoke about additional efforts planned later in August. Henricks highlighted the need to band…

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